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Posted by on June 9th, 2012 in blog, Brady Baylor, CFF Features | No Comments

In this most dormant of seasons for a college football fan, we’re left to ponder the postseason future of our sport.  The word “playoff” is practically a fixture of any postseason discussion now, so at least that seems to be a foregone conclusion, but in what form?  Recent talk of the matter has been dominated by the concept of a four-team playoff, with the top four teams at season’s end slugging it out in a three-game tournament, with two teams finally going at it to see which one comes out on top.  As I’m sure you noticed, I needed to prove to myself that I could count down from four to one, and I’ve done it. 

 

One of the most frequently discussed hang-ups in the four-team model discussion is whether only conference champions should be allowed in the little dance, or if it will simply be the top four teams as voted on (but by whom?) at season’s end, which we’ve recently seen could include multiple members of a single conference.  Ostensibly, it’s about only conference champions being worthy of a shot at the title, but it should be clear enough that other conference commissioners basically fear a four-team playoff that only includes SEC representatives.

 

SEC-related sidebar: a roadie last weekend took my lovely wife and I close enough to Hogville that we couldn’t help but drive by Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetville, AR.  What a cool venue!  Bobbie Petrino must have really been in love with that non-wife he shared a motorcycle crash with to leave a place like that!  He had the Hogs moving up through the ranks from perennial spoiler to contender and who knows where from there, but a bent toward pathological lying and womanizing won out in the end. 

 

…end SEC-related sidebar…

 

It should also be noted that the Big 10, et. al. prefer a plus-one format in which the season, and current bowl structure (presumably minus the championship game) play out just as they have, and then pit the nation’s #1 and #2 teams after this process against one another for the actual title.  Or, they could handle the current BCS system as-is.  Or, they would like to see only conference champions in a four-team playoff.  Or, they could go for three conference champions plus an at-large selection.  Ultimately, they might even go for a four-team structure as is being proposed by the SEC and is being endorsed by the Big 12.  Confused about their stance?  Big 10 Commissioner Jim Delaney expressed pretty much each of these stances during a recent discussion of the postseason future, obviously in preparation for a political career after college athletics.

 

A recent development of interest has legendary college football coaches serving on a committee of sorts, which will be tasked with voting on the final four teams at season’s end.

Final four-related sidebar: Final Four is a term that will not likely be used, given its association with the hardwood tourney, and Frozen Four will rarely apply, so what shall we dub this season’s end affair, should it come to fruition?  Share your thoughts with us in the convenient space below.

 

…end Final four-related sidebar…

 

So, back to the committee of legends.  Whom will it feature?  Knute Rockne, Bud Wilkinson, Bear Bryant?  I suppose not, since they’ll need to be successfully converting oxygen to carbon dioxide to qualify, but there are plenty of living legends out there, including Bobby Bowden, Vince Dooley, John Cooper, and others whom have reportedly volunteered their services to such a group.  They claim to do nothing but watch football, break down game film, and discuss opinions on such matters as it is, so it would be no stretch for them to use these observations and talents to narrow down the field to four worthy final candidates for a title run.  I don’t have a problem with that.  Experience, objectivity, and time to do it right.  What more could we ask for?

 

What say you?

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