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Posted by on February 6th, 2012 in blog, Brady Baylor, CFF Features, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

There are at least two ways of looking at the Big 10 recruiting hubbub involving newcomer head coach Urban Meyer.  On the one hand, if I accept a dinner invitation to someone’s home and subsequently renege due to a better offer, I believe that wreaks of rudeness.  On the other hand, if I have pledged to the salesman on the lot to buy a Chevy, but then I become enchanted with the Ford dealer’s offer down the street, that seems to be more palatable, more akin to a business transaction.  In case anyone hasn’t noticed, college football is all business, all the time, and Meyer’s new conference brotherhood of coaches had better get used to serious business and figure out how to deal with it like grownups.
 

So then, do MSU’s Mark Dantonio, Wisconsin’s Bret Bielema, and the other Big 10 coaches have a legitimate beef regarding Urban’s pilfering of some of their committed talent (I’d mention Penn State, but I think we’ll all offer a collective pass for any player seeking to bail out of that cesspool in the foreseeable future)?  I’m going with “no” as my answer.  Perhaps they (Big 10 coaches) have historically had a “gentlemen’s agreement” in place regarding such behaviors, but my guess is that it’s little more than a hastily concocted retort to a common occurrence at this level that happened to hurt their feelings this time.  True or not, many of us perceive Meyer’s arrival on the scene at Ohio State as the first step in what may be a legitimate shot at a Big 10 national title for the first time in a long time.  I’m sure he practiced similarly aggressive recruiting tactics during a stretch of dominance at Florida that yielded two national titles, including a 41-14 drubbing of the Buckeyes (far worse than the 24-14 victory over Oklahoma two years later, for those keeping score at home).

The Big 10 playbook has followed a relatively predictable trajectory over the past several years – look impressive against the Michigan directional schools, eek out a conference title, and possibly have the opportunity to get trashed by the SEC’s representative.   Urban will surely be looking to change this course, if only to the benefit of the Buckeyes, and an appropriately fitted national championship ring will certainly override the snarls of fellow coaches during media days, should it happen that way.  So go forth and conquer, Coach Meyer, but please don’t turn back on your dinner commitments for a sweeter deal.

3 Comments

3 Comments for this entry

  1. Bucky says:

    WHAT THE HECK?? Usually love your posts but you seem to justify the disease that has spread throughout this sport, LYING. The complete lack of commitment, lack of honor, lack of honesty, and lack of character that seems commonplace now has poisoned this sport. I love competition but let’s make it about competition. I can out recruit you, out coach you, out train you, and out play you. That all speaks to hard work and dedication. Lying speaks to easy way out and laziness whether it’s on the car lot or the football field. Lying to people (recruits, coaches, the press, fans, etc, etc, etc) is not good business. It’s a lie, period.

    • JS says:

      Not sure I get how getting a recruit to flip to you is automatically perceived as lying. Seems to me that Bielema has the same problem James Franklin (Vandy) has, he has 2 sets of rules. These recruits are pulled in every direction & are 18 YO, sometimes they change their mind. One possible way to eleviate this would be to offer early signing period just like CBB has. If a player has committed, don’t make him wait until NSD, he should be able to sign LOI, thus eliminating some 11th hour flips.

    • BB says:

      I’m on board with you to some extent about the character and commitment aspect of it, but like J.S., I’m not clear on where the lying is coming into play. While a player may change his mind, which could certainly be perceived as a lack of commitment, I would suggest that if the rules allow a change of heart up to a certain point in the process, and another coach capitalizes on that loophole, then so be it. If they want to change the rules and not allow this anymore, then of course I wouldn’t want to see the rules broken. Maybe I’m missing something, and please let me know if so.

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